In 1929, Chaim and Noami Amir emigrated from Yemen to Jerusalem. Shortly after arriving, Chaim landed a respectable position managing a tile manufacturing plant until the company was forced to shut its doors. With the weight of his family on his shoulders, Chaim struggled with the challenges brought about by unemployment. One day, Noami was taught by her neighbor the recipe for Egyptian falafel. She modified it to her liking, making the falafel from garbanzo beans instead of fava beans as well as adding her own combination of spices to the mix. As times grew tougher, she proposed the idea of selling falafel at the local marketplace to her husband. Embarrassed to sell such a product, Chaim dismissed the idea, but Noami insisted. She prepared the falafel at home, filling the pita bread with nothing but tahina, hot sauce, and pickles, and sent him off to make some money. Within hours, he sold all the falafel sandwiches. The following day she doubled his inventory and, yet again, he returned faster than expected, without any leftovers. This continued until one day contractors began to construct a building where Chaim used to sell his sandwiches. Noami, who by that time had saved some money from the falafel sales, contacted the landlord and purchased space in the building. By the time Chaim and his wife opened their falafel restaurant, it was not only the first in the region, but the most successful as well.
 
In 1939, Chaim and Noami established their falafel restaurant. A year prior, Noami gave birth to her fifth child, Yehuda. Yehuda began working at the restaurant at the age of six, standing on a stool to take orders. Once Yehuda would finish school, he would rush to the restaurant to lend a hand to his father and siblings. Yehuda continued to work there as he grew older, learning more about the food service industry with every passing day. At the age of 18, he temporarily Yemen to Jerusalem. Shortly after arriving, Chaim landed a respectable position managing a tile manufacturing plant until the company was forced to shut its doors. With the weight of his family on his shoulders, Chaim struggled with the challenges brought about by unemployment. One day, Noami was taught by her neighbor the recipe for Egyptian falafel. She modified it to her liking, making the falafel from garbanzo beans instead of fava beans as well as adding her own combination of spices to the mix. As times grew tougher, she proposed the idea of selling falafel at the local marketplace to her husband. Embarrassed to sell such a product, Chaim dismissed the idea, but Noami insisted. She prepared the falafel at home, filling the pita bread with nothing but tahina, hot sauce, and pickles, and sent him off to make some money. Within hours, he sold all the falafel sandwiches. The following day she doubled his inventory and, yet again, he returned faster than expected, without any leftovers. This continued until one day contractors began to construct a building where Chaim used to sell his sandwiches. Noami, who by that time had saved some money from the falafel sales, contacted the landlord and purchased space in the building. By the time Chaim and his wife opened their falafel restaurant, it was not only the first in the region, but the most successful as well.
 
In 1939, Chaim and Noami established their falafel restaurant. A year prior, Noami gave birth to her fifth child, Yehuda. Yehuda began working at the restaurant at the age of six, standing on a stool to take orders. Once Yehuda would finish school, he would rush to the restaurant to lend a hand to his father and siblings. Yehuda continued to work there as he grew older, learning more about the food service industry with every passing day. At the age of 18, he temporarily stopped working to serve in the army. After completing his service, he continued to work there but, by that time, all of his siblings decided to branch out and open their own restaurants.
 
It was 1965 when Yehuda opened his very own restaurant. He opened it in the center of Be’er Sheva and saved his earnings until he had enough to expand. In 1973, he did just that, opening a second store in Dimona, a city not too far from Be’er Sheva. In 1978, Yehuda and his wife, Frida, visited Los Angeles and immediately fell in love with the city. Seeing the opportunity in the untapped market, him and his family moved to Los Angeles to introduce the years-old recipe to America. 
 
On June 5, 1982, Yehuda and Frida Amir immigrated with their children to the Los Angeles. By August, they opened a restaurant on the corner of Ventura Place and Ventura Boulevard. Nobody knew what falafel was at that time, so they sold burgers and fries instead, introducing falafel to patrons along the way. Slowly but surely customers started falling in love with this foreign dish, eventually coming for the falafel, instead of the burgers and fries. They operated in that location until the property they rented was sold. In 1984, they moved to the Sherman Oaks Galleria’s food court. However, to satisfy popular demand, they ended up opening a second location in 1987 on the corner of Ventura Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. They eventually sold the property in the Galleria and were left with the Colfax location. During the course of his life, Yehuda transformed the restaurant from a mere fast-casual eatery to a place where customers can call home. By coupling Yehuda’s unwavering dedication to customer service with delicious Middle Eastern recipes, Amir’s Falafel has proudly served Studio City in the same location ever since.

AMIR'S FALAFEL HISTORY

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1-818-509-8641

WHERE ARE WE?

11711 Ventura Blvd.

Studio City CA 91604

OPENING HOURS

Monday - Sunday

10:30am-9:00pm
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